12.18.2013

Walnut Baby Ornament


 For a few years, I've had a Christmas tradition of making an ornament for the Christmas tree. This year I decided to recreate one of my favorite ornaments from my childhood: an adorable walnut baby. It's very easy to make and definitely squee-worthy. Here's how to make your own.

     Step 1: Carefully pry open your walnut. Ideally, you will have 2 perfect halves.
     Step 2: Scoop out the guts of the nut.
         Step 3: Cut one half of the nut in half. This step is tricky as it's hard to get a straight cut.
     I found it helpful to make small cuts across the nut to guide where it split.
      Step 4: Hot glue some ric rac to the cut edge of the quarter shell piece.
      Step 5: Hot clue a small piece of fabric to the inside of the shell.
      Step 6: Hot glue the other side of the fabric to the other side of the inside of the shell.
    Step 7: Stuff some stuffing or a cotton ball under the fabric.
     Step 8: Draw a face on a wooden bead and hot glue it on the stuffing and fabric.
    Step 9: Hot glue the two shell pieces together.
        Step 10: Hot glue small wooden beads onto a piece of a toothpick. 
    Hot glue onto the bottom of the shell.
    Step 11: Hot glue a piece of embroidery floss onto the front and back of the shell.

     Step 12: Hang from your tree and cherish forever!

The second baby from the left is our original walnut baby that is at least 30 years old. As you can see, I couldn't stop making walnut babies! Now there's a little walnut baby play date on my Christmas tree.

My awesome sister knitted a micro blanket for one of the walnut babies! She even wrote down the pattern for you to try! Find it on Ravelry
We also spent the last few days making a mini gingerbread village, from scratch! Here's a tiny peek. Take a look at all the photos at Knits For Life!

9.11.2013

Yarnbomb Squid Tree!

Lorna and I just finished installing our biggest creation yet: a giant squid yarnbomb complete with trapped crochet fish! I'm gonna let the pictures do most of the talking but here are some quick facts about it:


      Amount of yarn used: 4 miles
      Knitting time: 20 hours (using Bond Ultimate Sweater Machine)
      Installation time: 14 hours x 2 people
      Temperature during installation: 91°F

We learned a lot during this project. Here are some general tips to get you started on a yarnbomb adventure of your own! Take detailed measurements. In your preliminary research of your target location (lol) write down everything that you think could possibly matter. It's better to have too much information than too little. Make a swatch and count the number of stitches and rows while it's stretched around the object. We made a swatch large enough to wrap around the trunk of the tree and counted how many stitches are rows covered a 10 inch by 10 inch area. We then used this to calculate how big each panel needed to be. Do as much work at home as possible. It's a lot more comfortable sitting on the couch sewing panels together than it is standing precariously on the top rung of a ladder with your arms stretched straight above you. Talk to people about it! I love seeing people's reactions as we install our yarnbombs. Lately, we've been getting a lot of "so YOU'RE the ones doing this!" and "I've been noticing all the yarn stuff around lately". It's amazing to be able to converse with people as we're sewing feet on mailboxes and bicyclists on bike-shaped bike racks. 

For more details, visit Lorna's post at Knits For Life! And here's the goldfish pattern on Ravelry.